How does Kaz teach
the fundamentals of Go, Igo, Weiqi, Baduk lessons?


Hello! This is Kaz. Thanks for visiting this website.

On KGS I'm probably amateur 8 dan.

But please don't worry about losing all your stones. I'll teach and give advice along the game. So in my teaching game you'll never have to worry about losing your stones unless you wish to be killed.


In my teaching you might be able to kill my stones like the photo on the left.

|HOME | FAQ | ADVICE | LESSONS | FEES |

My (Kaz's)teaching style of Go, Igo, Weiqi, Baduk is that:

  1. I encourage my students to play an even game with me.
  2. You can have either White or Black..
  3. In my teaching, I intentionally make common amateur mistakes.
  4. In my lessons I teach various things, fuseki, middle game fight, tesuji, shape, the whole-board strategy, etc.
  5. I believe that "the simpler, the better."@So I focus mostly on teaching basics, basics for kyu players, basics for 3-dan players, and so on.
  6. I try not to teach exceptions and complicated things.
  7. In my teaching my moves are not the best move for me, but a move which is the best to teach a student. More details are below.
  8. I strongly encourage students to ask questions.
  9. In my teaching I take your requests, feedbacks, and suggestions, seriously and try to incorporate it ASAP.

Here are more detailed explanations:

  • Teai : I encourage my students to play an even game with me.
  • Even games: In my experience, even games allow students to learn a lot. And the

    students can use the lessons immediately in their games.
  • Satisfaction: So far 99% of the students satisfactorily choose even-game-lessons

    over handicap games.
  • Black or White?: You can have any color as long as it is either White or Black.
  • Any fuseki recommende? If you can't defeat Black's 3 star-point stones (sanrensei) or

    the Chinese fuseki, White is highly recommended. I can show White's fuseki.
  • What do you teach? In my lessons I teach various things, fuseki, middle game fight,

    tesuji, shape, the whole-board strategy, etc.
  • Do you play scary moves? In my teaching game, I intentionally make common amateur

    mistakes.
  • Why? The reason is:

    1
    . I can see how much you understand that stuff.

    2.
    I can teach how to punish a common mistake.
  • What about basics? In general I mostly focus on teaching basics, which are applicable

    to many other situations.
  • "Basics"? The meaning of "basics" differs in my definition. In my teaching there are

    basics for 20 kyu, 10 kyu, 5 kyu, 1-dan, 5-dan. These are all different.

    My blog explains the importance of learning basics further.
  • Do you teach something complicated? I try to avoid teaching exception moves

    and complicated moves. I believe the simpler, the better.
  • Give me an example! For example I avoid teaching a avalanche joseki, which takes

    weeks or months to memorize many of the variations, many of which are not easy

    to apply to other situations.
  • And? Instead of the avalanche joseki, I teach a simple joseki, which has simple tesuji

    and basic shape, which are applicable to many other situations.
  • But I'm still scared of you! When I play a teaching game, I try to think about

    the moves, not the best move for me, but a move which is the best to teach a student.
  • How much do you understand my plan? I'm aware that different students have different

    strengths, shortcomings, and weaknesses.
  • So? So if I see their strengths and weaknesses, I try different moves and different

    explanations.
  • And? That means that the more games of a student I see, the more easily I can

    pinpoint his or her strengths and weaknesses, thus the more easily I can find

    the best teaching move for her/him.
  • May I ask questions? I strongly encourage students to ask questions.

    There are no silly or stupid questions. All your questions are important because when

    I understand your difficulty, then I know what kind of service I should give. So it's better to ask questions.
  • Do you criticize my moves? I never criticize your moves. I also hardly ever say "it's

    a bad move". I believe that all your moves are there to help you become a better Go

    player. And my job is to find the best explanations to help you become a strong player

    as quickly as possible. Criticizing your moves may very well make you afraid of playing

    more games. So I wouldn't do that.
  • But you did criticize me! If I criticize your moves, games and make you feel sick, please

    let me know. I'll come up with some kind of compensation... maybe to look at more of

    your games without charge. Even if I make you uncomfortable unintentionally, please

    let me know. I must know that in order not to make the same mistake. BTW, I do say

    "it's a common mistake." Is that okay?
  • I play stupid moves! Many people worry about their moves and hesitate to show

    their games by saying"; I made many stupid mistakes." I always diagree. It's a matter

    of whether you would make the most of your moves. Besides, I make many stupid and

    silly mistakes in the eyes of the top pros. Well, think of it this way. If you don't make

    mistakes, you're a god of Go.
  • But I still hesitate to show my games. If you don't show me your games, how can

    I help you become a stronger Go player.
  • I played so badly, and I know my mistakes. So you don't need to go over this game.

    Many people say that. But what you think is often very different from what you have

    played. When I go over it, the content of the game is often the opposite of what you think.

    Often "bad game" in your eye looks like a very good game to me. Also keep in mind that

    you can learm most from your worst game.
  • I have some requests! If you have any requests, feedbacks, suggestions, etc., please

    feel free to let me know. If I find your requests, feedbacks, and suggestions which are

    useful and possible to incorporate into my teaching, I'll try to incorporate it ASAP.
  • What's your teaching policy? My teaching policy is to accommodate my students'

    wishes as much as possible.

| HOME | FAQ | ADVICE | LESSONS | FEES |TOP PAGE |

All material on this site is authored by, property of, and copyright Kaz Furuyama. Please don't distribute it.